Forword
The preservation of viable urban neighborhoods is the major goal of the federal Housing and Community Development Act of 1974. The Act encourages the conservation of established neighborhoods as resources of moderately priced housing. In response to the challenge issued by that Act, the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors adopted the Community Development Plan and Program for Fairfax County on February 26, 1975. This action established a new program in the County to provide grants of federal money for the elimination of blight and the improvement of community services and public facilities, principally in areas of low and moderate income. Huntington is such an area.

The Fairfax County Department of Housing and Community Development, under the auspice of the Redevelopment and Housing Authority, undertook a study of existing conditions in the Huntington area in the Fall of 1975 and concluded that the neighborhood was appropriate for preservation. Although the basic stock of duplex housing and apartment units in Huntington is sound, the community has deteriorated during recent years. A combination of economic, environmental, and transportation problems has caused the community to decline, and the Metro station that will be located immediately adjacent to Huntington poses a threat to neighborhood stability.

In order to reverse the trend toward deterioration and to preserve the assets of the Huntington neighborhood, the Fairfax County Redevelopment and Housing Authority approved the proposed Neighborhood Improvement Program and Conservation Plan for Huntington and forwarded it to the Board of Supervisors. At the conclusion of a public hearing on March 30, 1976, the Board adopted the Program and Plan.

The Program and Plan that are presented in the following pages were developed with valuable assistance from the people who live in Huntington and from Mount Vernon Supervisor, Warren Cikins. Without their continued support and interest in the future of the neighborhood, the conservation of Huntington would not be possible.


Boundaries

Summary
Huntington, a community composed primarily of duplex and low-rise apartment units, lies between U.S. Route 1 and Telegraph Road, just south of the Beltway. The community is immediately adjacent to a future Metro station and the northern portion of the community falls within the 100-year floodplain of Cameron Run. In September, 1975, a questionnaire was distributed to residents of Huntington to elicit their evaluation of the problems in the community. Forty percent of the residents of the 578 duplex and single-family units responded and identified their concerns as follows:
  • Insufficient parking and congested streets are serious problems in Huntington.
  • Drainage problems are also considered serious, especially by residents of Lower Huntington. Sixty-four percent of these residents experience poor drainage on their property and occasional flooding in their houses.
  • A number of residents feel that homes in Huntington are in need of repair, and nearly three quarters of the resident homeowners indicated interest in improving their dwellings if low-interest financing were available.
  • Seventy-eight percent of the residents own their homes. Of those who do not, about 60 percent would be interested in buying if a low-interest loan were available.
  • A number of Huntington residents are retired, living on a fixed income.
  • Forty-four percent of the children are six years old or under, and yet there are only limited tot lot facilities in Lower Huntington and none in Upper Huntington.
  • Eighty-two percent of the residents would like to see improvements to the community building. The center is so poorly marked that some of the respondents did not know where the building is located.

In addition to the questionnaire, extensive meetings were held during the Fall and Winter of 1975 with committees of the citizens Association. Frequently citizens mentioned the impact that the planned Metro station has had, and will continue to have, on their lives. they also demonstrated concern about the proposed widening of Huntington Avenue because it will further divide the community and increase the danger for children crossing the avenue. Environmental problems, especially the slippage soils which cause cracked foundations and twisted sidewalks, were identified by residents as being serious problems.

These conditions justify the establishment of a comprehensive Neighborhood Improvement Program and Conservation Plan to direct both public and private resources towards the improvement of the Huntington area. Huntington is not appropriate for the traditional type of urban renewal or redevelopment actions, but would best be served by the establishment of the area as a "Conservation Project" as defined by Virginia state law, and the preparation of a "Conservation Plan" within this framework. With guidance from the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors, the Department of Housing and Community Development prepared a Neighborhood Improvement Program and Conservation Plan. The Redevelopment and Housing Authority approved the Program and Plan on March 1, 1976, and forwarded it to the Board. After public hearing the Board adopted the Neighborhood Improvement Program and Conservation Plan for Huntington on March 30, 1976.

The basic goal of the Huntington Neighborhood Improvement Program is the conservation and development of a viable and sound residential community.

To realize this goal, it will be necessary for Huntington residents to undertake the upgrading of their own neighborhood concurrent with public improvement projects. Public activities will be designed to be supportive of these individual actions, and will include:

  • implementing systematic improvements to the public facilities of the area;
  • assisting property owners in improving the housing conditions through such tools as a Home Improvement Loan and Grant Program;
  • implementing a home purchase program for residents who now rent but would like to buy their homes; and
  • improving the delivery of the many public and social services available to the area.

Specifically, the Neighborhood Improvement Program lists a series of public improvement projects that will be necessary to improve the livability of Huntington. As a first priority, citizens have called for improvements to the outmoded community center. Other projects include updating the storm drainage system; making environmental improvements such as street lighting; street planting and park development; and improving pedestrian and vehicular circulation. Some of the projects included in the Neighborhood Improvement Program have been funded out of 1976 Community Development Block Grant monies, some will be funded from other governmental revenues, and still others will have to wait for future funding. Another major component of the Neighborhood Improvement Program is the Home Improvement Loan and Grant Program. Under this program homeowners in Huntington will be eligible for low-interest loans and grants to carry out improvements and repairs to their homes including modernization of heating systems; painting and papering; and insulation. In the future another type of housing program will be initiated to assist renters in purchasing the home they are living in.

The Conservation Plan, the second part of the following document, provides the legal mechanisms for carrying out the activities of the Neighborhood Improvement Program; firmly establishes land use densities for the Conservation Area; and sets standards for future development and rehabilitation in the community. Many of the objectives of the Neighborhood Improvement Program can be achieved through the County's existing authority to provide public facilities. However, since the Board of Supervisors has adopted a Conservation Plan under Title 36 of the Code of Virginia, the Redevelopment and Housing Authority can now assist in financing and granting home improvement loans and grants, financing a home purchase assistance plan, and providing public facilities not ordinarily the responsibility of the County, such as the provision of traffic signals. The Conservation Plan went into effect on March 30, 1976, when it was adopted by the Board of Supervisors. It will remain in effect for twenty-five years to guide conservation and rehabilitation in Huntington.

Background
Huntington is a community of duplex houses and apartments in the urbanized portion of Fairfax County, just south of Alexandria. The community lies between U. S. Route 1 and Telegraph Road, south of the Beltway and Cameron Run. Upper Huntington, or that part of the community south of Huntington Avenue, lies on the steep valley walls of Cameron Run. Lower Huntington, north of Huntington Avenue, is in the flat lowlands adjacent to the stream. Currently only the Huntington subdivision is included in the Neighborhood Improvement Program, but the boundaries might be expanded at a later date if residents of nearby areas wished to be included.

During the post World War II housing boom in the Washington area, several people bought land in the Huntington area and then subdivided into small lots for duplex housing and apartments. By 1947, George Ford and Joseph Bressler had subdivided most of the land in what is now known as Huntington. In 1948, development began in Lower Huntington and then was shifted to the steep slopes of Upper Huntington in the early fifties. The apartments on Farrington Avenue were not built until the mid-fifties and those on Glendale Terrace were completed in the early sixties.

Goals and Objectives
The primary goal of the Federal Housing and Community Development Act of 1974 is the development of viable urban communities by providing block grant money to localities to meet a series of objectives, including:

  1. the elimination and prevention of blighting influences and deterioration of property and neighborhoods;
  2. the elimination of conditions detrimental to health, safety and public welfare;
  3. the provision of decent housing and a suitable living environment;
  4. the expansion of economic opportunities;
  5. the expansion and improvement of the quantity and quality of community services and public facilities; and
  6. a more rational utilization of land and natural resources.

The activities undertaken to meet these objectives are to be concentrated primarily in areas of low and moderate income households. Grant money can be spent for activities including the acquisition of property for rehabilitation or for public use, the construction of public facilities and utility systems, the provision of public services to a neighborhood, and planning and administration costs for community development activities.

Under the framework of eligible activities and general objectives set by the federal government, a more definitive set of goals and objectives has been developed for the Huntington community. This program proposes that the basic goal of the Huntington Neighborhood Improvement Program be the development in Huntington of a viable residential community. The specific objectives to meet this basic goal include:

  1. The development of a Neighborhood Improvement Program and Conservation Plan for Huntington which is responsive to the needs of the community in light of the impacts of adjacent high intensity development and the planned Metro station.
    • Ensure that each new project within the community, whether public or private, supports the overall goals of the Neighborhood Improvement Program.
    • Develop standards for parking and environmental improvements designed to enhance the overall character of the neighborhood and strengthen neighborhood identity.

  2. The improvement of the quality of life for the existing residents through the development of a Public Improvements Program.
    • Improve the storm water drainage system to provide for the efficient removal of surface water from areas within Huntington.
    • Pursue means of alleviating flooding problems caused by the tidal flow of flood waters from the Potomac.
    • Provide more small parks and active recreational facilities.
    • Discourage trash dumping on vacant land, and provide for clean-up of littered areas.
    • Improve on-street and off-street parking systems to both increase parking capacity and alleviate the congestion of extremely narrow neighborhood streets.
    • Consider such necessary improvements to the local streets as cul-de-sacs on dead-end streets, one-way street systems and other means of reducing street congestion.
    • Work with the Virginia Department of Highways and Transportation (VDHIT) and Metro to ensure appropriate signalization and street markings to enable safe pedestrian movement between the two halves of the Huntington community.

  3. The strengthening of the existing residential character of the community and creation of a positive, stable environment for family living.
    • Improve the community center to better serve the needs of the community and to be a focal point and symbol of Huntington's renewed stability and community pride.
    • Establish an environmental improvements plan and program to help mitigate the impacts of widened Huntington Avenue on the community as well as present immediate visual evidence of community renewal.
    • Ensure that development of convenience shopping facilities at the neighborhood level be compatible with the residential nature of the surroundings.
    • Establish a set of development and design standards to encourage a high level of quality in the provision of future improvements.
    • Provide additional street lighting to bring the existing system up to standard and thus reduce the incidence of traffic accidents and vandalism.
    • Encourage the better utilization of existing community service programs, and provide for the improvement of programs wherever they are deficient.
    • Investigate redistricting school boundaries so that children from Upper and Lower Huntington attend the same schools

  4. The improvement of the quality of the housing supply to provide all residents with the opportunity for a decent, safe, and sanitary dwelling unit within their income means.
    • Provide low-interest home improvement loans and grants to property owners, especially those with modest incomes.
    • Stimulate the private rehabilitation of existing dwellings, and ensure that the improvements are enduring and of high quality.
    • Encourage housing opportunities for a range of income and age groups, but do so within a framework that generally maintains the County's irreplaceable resource of moderate cost housing.
    • Encourage existing residents of the area to remain.
    • Minimize the impact of the tax burden on residents of low or fixed income by encouraging all eligible citizens to utilize the tax relief program. Also investigate the possibility of a tax relief program for low-income residents.
    • Buffer existing residential areas from objectionable nonresidential uses, blighting influences, and any new development.
    • Establish a program to inform all residents of the relationship between improper landscaping and slippage-prone soil damage to homes and walks.
    • Promote programs to ensure the protection and safety of residents and their property.
    • Investigate the preservation of existing apartment units in Huntington as healthful, safe and sanitary dwelling units for low and moderate income residents.

  5. The encouragement of an ongoing process of citizen participation to ensure active community involvement and effective citizen-County cooperation in the planning process.

Recommendations
The Neighborhood Improvement Program and Conservation Plan were approved by the Redevelopment and Housing Authority on March 1, 1976, and adopted by the Board of Supervisors on March 30, 1976. The Authority and the Board previously adopted a cooperation agreement to expedite the implementation of programs such as these. To ensure that continued efforts to meet the goals of the Neighborhood Improvement Program are maintained, the following actions are necessary:
  1. The adoption and provision of annual funding for programs to improve existing conditions in Huntington will be recommended to the Board of Supervisors. Portions of the Program have been funded for FY-77 from the County's federal Community Development entitlement. It is recommended that funds from all available sources be appropriated at the beginning of subsequent program years.

  2. The investigation of a program to alleviate the impact of taxes on low and moderate income homeowners and renters as an incentive to participate in home improvement programs. Possible expansion of the current tax relief program for the elderly to include all low and moderate income families should be studied. A concerted effort to gain the full participation of elderly homeowners and renters in the program should be initiated.

    The ultimate success of a Huntington Neighborhood Improvement Program and Conservation Plan will depend upon the extent of public and private investment and confidence in the community. Increased public expenditures for public improvements is being proposed as a concrete measure of government's support for the community. Increased investment by private enterprise (lending institutions) is needed as an expression of confidence in the future of the community. The Neighborhood Improvement Program and Conservation Plan will encourage this investment by:
    • clarifying and removing any uncertainty about land use plans for the area, through the adoption of the Conservation Plan;
    • providing public improvements which add to the attractiveness of the community and which reinforce a sense of community; and
    • making available low-cost financing and other assistance which provides an incentive to home owners to improve their property.

Initially, the Neighborhood Improvement Program addresses physical improvements and housing programs. However, in future years, various social service programs will be considered for inclusion in the Improvement Program. Such social programs might be directed at senior citizens, the mentally and physically handicapped, and youths.


Neighborhood

Background
Huntington is a community of duplex houses and apartments in the urbanized portion of Fairfax County, just south of Alexandria. The community lies between U. S. Route 1 and Telegraph Road, south of the Beltway and Cameron Run. Upper Huntington, or that part of the community south of Huntington Avenue, lies on the steep valley walls of Cameron Run. Lower Huntington, north of Huntington Avenue, is in the flat lowlands adjacent to the stream. Currently only the Huntington subdivision is included in the Neighborhood Improvement Program, but the boundaries might be expanded at a later date if residents of nearby areas wished to be included.

During the post World War II housing boom in the Washington area, several people bought land in the Huntington area and then subdivided into small lots for duplex housing and apartments. By 1947, George Ford and Joseph Bressler had subdivided most of the land in what is now known as Huntington. In 1948, development began in Lower Huntington and then was shifted to the steep slopes of Upper Huntington in the early fifties. The apartments on Farrington Avenue were not built until the mid-fifties and those on Glendale Terrace were completed in the early sixties.

Goals and Objectives
The primary goal of the Federal Housing and Community Development Act of 1974 is the development of viable urban communities by providing block grant money to localities to meet a series of objectives, including:

  1. the elimination and prevention of blighting influences and deterioration of property and neighborhoods;
  2. the elimination of conditions detrimental to health, safety and public welfare;
  3. the provision of decent housing and a suitable living environment;
  4. the expansion of economic opportunities;
  5. the expansion and improvement of the quantity and quality of community services and public facilities; and
  6. a more rational utilization of land and natural resources.

The activities undertaken to meet these objectives are to be concentrated primarily in areas of low and moderate income households. Grant money can be spent for activities including the acquisition of property for rehabilitation or for public use, the construction of public facilities and utility systems, the provision of public services to a neighborhood, and planning and administration costs for community development activities.

Under the framework of eligible activities and general objectives set by the federal government, a more definitive set of goals and objectives has been developed for the Huntington community. This program proposes that the basic goal of the Huntington Neighborhood Improvement Program be the development in Huntington of a viable residential community. The specific objectives to meet this basic goal include:

  1. The development of a Neighborhood Improvement Program and Conservation Plan for Huntington which is responsive to the needs of the community in light of the impacts of adjacent high intensity development and the planned Metro station.
    • Ensure that each new project within the community, whether public or private, supports the overall goals of the Neighborhood Improvement Program.
    • Develop standards for parking and environmental improvements designed to enhance the overall character of the neighborhood and strengthen neighborhood identity.

  2. The improvement of the quality of life for the existing residents through the development of a Public Improvements Program.
    • Improve the storm water drainage system to provide for the efficient removal of surface water from areas within Huntington.
    • Pursue means of alleviating flooding problems caused by the tidal flow of flood waters from the Potomac.
    • Provide more small parks and active recreational facilities.
    • Discourage trash dumping on vacant land, and provide for clean-up of littered areas.
    • Improve on-street and off-street parking systems to both increase parking capacity and alleviate the congestion of extremely narrow neighborhood streets.
    • Consider such necessary improvements to the local streets as cul-de-sacs on dead-end streets, one-way street systems and other means of reducing street congestion.
    • Work with the Virginia Department of Highways and Transportation (VDHIT) and Metro to ensure appropriate signalization and street markings to enable safe pedestrian movement between the two halves of the Huntington community.

  3. The strengthening of the existing residential character of the community and creation of a positive, stable environment for family living.
    • Improve the community center to better serve the needs of the community and to be a focal point and symbol of Huntington's renewed stability and community pride.
    • Establish an environmental improvements plan and program to help mitigate the impacts of widened Huntington Avenue on the community as well as present immediate visual evidence of community renewal.
    • Ensure that development of convenience shopping facilities at the neighborhood level be compatible with the residential nature of the surroundings.
    • Establish a set of development and design standards to encourage a high level of quality in the provision of future improvements.
    • Provide additional street lighting to bring the existing system up to standard and thus reduce the incidence of traffic accidents and vandalism.
    • Encourage the better utilization of existing community service programs, and provide for the improvement of programs wherever they are deficient.
    • Investigate redistricting school boundaries so that children from Upper and Lower Huntington attend the same schools

  4. The improvement of the quality of the housing supply to provide all residents with the opportunity for a decent, safe, and sanitary dwelling unit within their income means.
    • Provide low-interest home improvement loans and grants to property owners, especially those with modest incomes.
    • Stimulate the private rehabilitation of existing dwellings, and ensure that the improvements are enduring and of high quality.
    • Encourage housing opportunities for a range of income and age groups, but do so within a framework that generally maintains the County's irreplaceable resource of moderate cost housing.
    • Encourage existing residents of the area to remain.
    • Minimize the impact of the tax burden on residents of low or fixed income by encouraging all eligible citizens to utilize the tax relief program. Also investigate the possibility of a tax relief program for low-income residents.
    • Buffer existing residential areas from objectionable nonresidential uses, blighting influences, and any new development.
    • Establish a program to inform all residents of the relationship between improper landscaping and slippage-prone soil damage to homes and walks.
    • Promote programs to ensure the protection and safety of residents and their property.
    • Investigate the preservation of existing apartment units in Huntington as healthful, safe and sanitary dwelling units for low and moderate income residents.

  5. The encouragement of an ongoing process of citizen participation to ensure active community involvement and effective citizen-County cooperation in the planning process.

Recommendations
The Neighborhood Improvement Program and Conservation Plan were approved by the Redevelopment and Housing Authority on March 1, 1976, and adopted by the Board of Supervisors on March 30, 1976. The Authority and the Board previously adopted a cooperation agreement to expedite the implementation of programs such as these. To ensure that continued efforts to meet the goals of the Neighborhood Improvement Program are maintained, the following actions are necessary:
  1. The adoption and provision of annual funding for programs to improve existing conditions in Huntington will be recommended to the Board of Supervisors. Portions of the Program have been funded for FY-77 from the County's federal Community Development entitlement. It is recommended that funds from all available sources be appropriated at the beginning of subsequent program years.

  2. The investigation of a program to alleviate the impact of taxes on low and moderate income homeowners and renters as an incentive to participate in home improvement programs. Possible expansion of the current tax relief program for the elderly to include all low and moderate income families should be studied. A concerted effort to gain the full participation of elderly homeowners and renters in the program should be initiated.

    The ultimate success of a Huntington Neighborhood Improvement Program and Conservation Plan will depend upon the extent of public and private investment and confidence in the community. Increased public expenditures for public improvements is being proposed as a concrete measure of government's support for the community. Increased investment by private enterprise (lending institutions) is needed as an expression of confidence in the future of the community. The Neighborhood Improvement Program and Conservation Plan will encourage this investment by:
    • clarifying and removing any uncertainty about land use plans for the area, through the adoption of the Conservation Plan;
    • providing public improvements which add to the attractiveness of the community and which reinforce a sense of community; and
    • making available low-cost financing and other assistance which provides an incentive to home owners to improve their property.

Initially, the Neighborhood Improvement Program addresses physical improvements and housing programs. However, in future years, various social service programs will be considered for inclusion in the Improvement Program. Such social programs might be directed at senior citizens, the mentally and physically handicapped, and youths.


Conservation Plan

Boundaries for Conservation Area
All lots and parcels of the Huntington and Annalane Terrace Subdivisions are included within the program area boundaries and are described in the land records of Fairfax County in the deeds beginning on pages noted below:

Huntington Subdivision:

  • Section 1 Deed Book 499, page 512
  • Section 2 Deed Book 504, page 216
  • Section 3 Block A Deed Book 513, page 168
    Block B Deed Book 527, page 72
    Block C Deed Book 527, page 78
    Block D Deed Book 527, page 84
    Block E Deed Book 549, page 182
  • Sections 4, 5, 6 Deed Book 576, page 127
  • Section 7 Deed Book 602, page 537
  • Section 8 Deed Book 800, page 6
  • Section 9 Deed Book 798, page 345

Annalane Terrace SubDivision:

  • Deed Book 1414, page 289

The following individual parcels, described in said land records, are also included in the program area:

  • Parcel 83-1-01-60 Deed Book 3786, page 469
  • 83-3-01-84 Deed Book 1237, page 256
  • 83-3-01-85 Deed Book 794, page 452

The boundaries of these parcels and subdivisions, which are included in the Huntington Neighborhood Improvement Program Area, are described graphically on the accompanying property map.


Existing Conditions
Several conditions have been identified which substantiate the fact that Huntington is physically deteriorating and in need of conservation through appropriate public action. the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors passed a resolution on October 20, 1975, requesting the Fairfax County Redevelopment and Housing Authority (hereinafter referred to as the Authority) to investigate the conditions in Huntington and, "if such investigation indicates that the conservation of the area is feasible, to delineate such area and prepare a Conservation Plan for the conservation thereof..." These conditions, which are in accordance with the standards set forth in Section 36-49.1 of Title 36 of the Code of Virginia, as amended, are outlined below and are covered more fully in the Conditions Report, submitted to the Board of Supervisors on October 10, 1975.

A. Community Economic Instability    
Owing to the future location of a Metro Station immediately adjacent to Huntington, there has been considerable economic activity in the community in anticipation of a dramatic rise in the value of the duplexes or of potential redevelopment of the community. Increased buying and selling of units has not only added to community economic instability but has also fostered a relatively high percentage of absentee owners which often has led to deteriorated housing conditions.

B. Low Land and Improvement Values    
An analysis of a representative sample of property and housing values within the Huntington study area revealed that both values are considerably lower than the County norm. The total appraised value of a typical house and lot is approximately $21,000 in Huntington, whereas the County average is about $60,000.

C. Environmental Problems    

  1. Drainage - Most of Huntington experiences localized storm drainage problems. Because the storm sewer system is old and inadequate, storm water runoff frequently overflows the system into backyards, over sidewalks, and sometimes into houses. Several residents complain that they have underground springs beneath their houses and have to have sump pumps running continuously to keep their basements dry.
  2. Flooding - Because of its position within the 100-year floodplain of the tidal portion of Cameron Run, part of Huntington is subject to periodic flooding. Seventy-six units are within the floodplain; not only do they experience flooding from the stream but they have received sewage back-up into their homes.
  3. Slippage Soils - Much of Huntington was built on slippage prone soils which, through the shrink-swell process, have caused twisted sidewalks, broken retaining walls and cracked foundations. Many of these problems could have been avoided at the time of construction if more had been known of the properties of slippage clays. To correct the damage now will often cause considerable expense and inconvenience to the homeowner.
  4. Noise - Residents of Lower Huntington note that noise from I-495 adversely impacts them since there is now no barrier to the sound traveling across Cameron Run and the park. In addition, noise from Huntington Avenue affects the people living on that street. This problem will undoubtedly worsen when Huntington Avenue is widened.

D. Inadequate Public Facilities    

  1. Streets - The streets of Huntington are extremely narrow and lack adequate parking space. In some cases the streets are so congested that it is impossible for two cars to pass each other. Often there are not enough parking spaces for residents to park near their homes. Most dead-end streets do not have turn-around facilities and are so crowded that users must back out a distance of 500 feet or more. In two questionnaires distributed in September, 1975, more than one-third of the residents identified parking as their most serious community problem.

    Some of the roads in Huntington are ln poor condition. Several lack adequate curb and gutter, some have deteriorated surfaces, and the utility strip along many of the streets is full of ruts and mud holes where cars have jumped the curb to park in that strip.

    Huntington Avenue is a heavily traveled street where traffic moves at a rapid pace. It has become a barrier between Upper and Lower Huntington because children are not allowed to cross the busy thoroughfare and adults are not encouraged to do so. There are no stop lights or walkways to aid pedestrian crossing.

  2. Parks and Open Space - The active recreation facilities in the community are exclusively in Lower Huntington, and even these facilities are inadequate. Residents identified the need for tot lots, particularly in Upper Huntington where there is no common open space. Although there is a tot lot on Farrington Avenue in Lower Huntington, it is poorly designed and therefore underused. Another recreation facility in Lower Huntington - a climbing apparatus - is designed for use by older children and is unsafe for toddlers.

    There also appears to be a lack of active recreation facilities for adults and older children. Again, the only existing facility, a ball field, is in Lower Huntington and, therefore, not readily accessible to the entire community.

  3. Community Center - There is a community center in Lower Huntington, accessible via an unpaved, overgrown alley. The center lacks adequate access and parking, it is not clearly marked (many residents do not know it exists), and it is poorly landscaped. The interior facilities are not designed for the current activities so there is not enough storage room and there is little space for interior recreation. Eighty percent of respondents to the September questionnaire would like to see improvements to that building.

E. Housing in Need of Repair   
A windshield survey of housing conditions was conducted in the fall of 1975 and revealed that over fifty percent of the units exhibit some sign of deterioration. There are approximately 300 housing units in need of a housing rehabilitation program.

F. Low Income Levels   
Many residents cannot afford to maintain or rehabilitate their homes through the use of conventional financing. In Census Tract 4019 over six percent of all families had incomes below the poverty level and thirty-seven percent received less than $10,000. In addition, there are a number of older, retired homeowners in Huntington living on fixed incomes.

Undertakings of a Conservation Plan
A. General Requirements   
This Conservation Plan shall be initiated by the Authority after it is approved and adopted by the Board of Supervisors. The Authority and the Board shall each conduct a public hearing prior to approval of the Conservation Plan. All actions and undertakings under the power of eminent domain authorized in this Conservation Plan shall be deemed to be public uses as stipulated in Title 36 of the Code of Virginia, as amended. This Plan has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Code, of Virginia.

B. Authorized Undertaking   
Within the Conservation Project Area, the power of the Authority to carry out the work or undertaking as called for in the Conservation Plan includes the following:

  1. Acquisition of property within the conservation area designated for public use, subject to Section Y of the Conservation Plan;
  2. Acquisition of other property through private purchase and the rehabilitation of property so acquired;
  3. Provision for installation, construction or reconstruction of streets, utilities, parks, parking facilities, playgrounds, public buildings and other site improvements essential to the conservation or rehabilitation planned;
  4. Disposition of acquired land or improvements through sale, lease, or other conveyance; and
  5. Assistance to property owners or occupants within the Conservation Area in the improvement of their respective holdings, directed toward prevention and elimination of blight.

C. Cooperation with County Agencies   
Fairfax County and local agencies and authorities shall aid and cooperate with the Authority under the powers of the Code of Virginia for the purpose of assisting the development and administration of the Conservation Plan.

Relationship to Local Objectives
The Conservation Plan is consistent with the goals and objectives set forth in the Planning and Land Use System (PLUS) Program as contained in the adopted Countywide and Area lV Plans. Both Plans recommend improvement and maintenance of housing and neighborhood quality. Specific objectives to attain this goal include:

  • To initiate Community Development Programs in communities that indicate the need.
  • To conserve and assure maintenance of existing moderate income neighborhoods.
  • To prevent older declining structures and neighborhoods from becoming substandard.
  • to improve physical community services (e.g., streets, sidewalks, lighting) in existing neighborhoods.
  • To preserve existing residential neighborhoods in or immediately adjacent to the Huntington Metro area as stable resources.
  • To ensure that economic pressure on these neighborhoods, which may be brought about by the presence of Metro, does not result in their deterioration as desirable residential communities.

It is intended that the Conservation Plan be consistent with all County codes and ordinances, and Virginia Department of Highways and Transportation plans. In the event that the Conservation Plan is more stringent than other applicable ordinances or plans, the Conservation Plan shall take precedence.

Property Acquisition
A. General Conditions and Limitation. 
Although substantial acquisition of property is not anticipated, the Authority is empowered to acquire properties within the Conservation Project by purchase, or eminent domain pursuant to law for a public use as designated by the Conservation Plan. All acquisitions under the Conservation Plan shall be carried out consistent with the regulations of the Federal Uniform Relocation and Real Property Acquisition Act of 1970, as amended, and Title 36 of the Code of Virginia, 1950, as amended.

B. Special Conditions for Acquisition of Undesignated Properties    
The acquisition of property for the purpose of rehabilitation or public use may be undertaken when the owner offers such property for sale to the Authority at fair market value. Any units so purchased may be rehabilitated and then resold or leased.

C. Disposition of Acquired Properties   
The Authority may dispose of land and improvements, which have been acquired under the conditions of the Code of Virginia, through sale, lease, or other conveyance.

In order to insure the improvement of the area in accordance with the Plan, the purchasers or lessees of any Authority-acquired properties shall be subject to the following conditions for a period of twenty-five years from the date of disposition:

  1. The installation or construction of any improvements of a permanent nature as specified in the Plan will commence within the time period fixed as reasonable by the Authority.
  2. The sale, lease, or occupancy of all such properties will be executed without restrictions on the basis of race, color, creed, national origin, religion, sex, or marital status.


Relocation Policy
It is not anticipated that there will be any displacement of persons or businesses located within the project boundaries. In the event that there is a need to acquire occupied properties, the Authority will institute and administer a relocation program which will provide all benefits and protections of the Federal Uniform Relocation and Real Property Acquisition Act. Persons will not be required to vacate these properties located within the project area until such time that decent, safe, and sanitary accommodation on suitable sites will be made available at rents or prices that are within their financial means. The Authority will advise all affected persons of those benefits to which they are entitled and will maintain close contact with them throughout the project period. There will be no discrimination on the basis of race, creed, color, national origin, religion, sex, or marital status in the relocation program, as is required by law. Every effort will be made to find relocation sites within the project area for any displacees.

Procedures for Rehabilitation
A Home Improvement Loan and Grant Program will be instituted and administered by the Authority to assist owners of residential structures within the project area in upgrading their properties. The program will be financed by both public and private funds.

Every property owner in the Huntington area is eligible to receive a home improvement loan at a sliding scale interest rate based upon gross annual income. Property owners with low annual incomes will be further eligible for grants.

Property owners will be notified of their eligibility to receive a loan or grant by the Authority. The Home Improvement Loan and Grant Program will be restricted to single family detached and attached housing. Funds will be made available at various rates to all property owners with acceptable credit histories, depending upon income and ability to make payments.

The Authority may acquire properties through private purchase which are offered to it by the owners. Upon acquisition of such property, the Authority may, at its option:

  1. rehabilitate the structure(s) and then sell or lease them, or
  2. dispose of such property under conditions obligating the purchaser to rehabilitate the property within a period of eighteen months after transfer of title.

In order to insure that the rehabilitation which is undertaken by Private developers is completed and that the property will be used in a manner which is consistent with the objectives of this plan, the disposition documents shall contain the appropriate restrictions running with the land. Such restrictions shall be imposed as covenants running with the land for a period of twenty-five years from the date of disposition.

After rehabilitation, properties must be in compliance with Conservation Plan standards, HUD Property Rehabilitation Standards, and housing hygiene and building codes applicable in Fairfax County, unless waived as provided for in Section VIII, C, 2, b, of this Plan. The waivers shall apply only to recipients of home improvement loans and grants, and shall be used only in limited cases to allow for the economic rehabilitation of existing dwelling units without requiring unnecessary or excessive alterations or repairs.

Regulations and Standards
A. General Provision   
The following controls and regulations covering land use and building requirements provide guidelines for the project area. Maximum ingenuity and freedom of design consistent with the objectives of the Neighborhood Improvement Program is encouraged for any rehabilitation or new development. Unless otherwise stated below, all capital improvement projects will be constructed or improved ln accordance with the Conservation Plan and with all applicable local and state ordinances and codes.

B. Development Review   
Upon adoption of the Conservation Plan, all the following requests, plans, and proposals will be forwarded by the County to the Authority for review and comment. The Authority will follow all regulations, limitations, and time schedules of the County in reviewing and commenting on said documents. Working with a committee designated by the Huntington Citizens Association, the Authority will conduct all such reviews as called for ln this section of the Conservation Plan.

  1. Zoning Actions - The Authority, with the Committee, shall review and comment upon all new or pending zoning actions in the Neighborhood Conservation Project. All rezoning requests, special use permit requests, and special exception requests for properties that are wholly or partially within the program boundaries shall be submitted to the Authority at the same time they are submitted to the County of Fairfax. All such requests will be reviewed with respect to their conformance with the objectives of the Conservation Plan.

  2. Development and Site Plans - The Authority, with the Committee, shall review and comment upon the developer's plans and working drawings particularly as they are concerned with, but not limited to, site planning, architectural layout, materials to be used in construction, landscaping, access, advertising and identification signs, streets and sidewalks.

    All proposed development and site plans for projects that are wholly or partially within the program boundaries shall be submitted to the Authority at the same time as they are submitted to the County of Fairfax.

  3. Public Improvements - All public and quasi-public agencies which propose projects within the program area boundaries will be required to submit preliminary and final working drawings or site plans and building elevations in sufficient detail to show access, layout, landscaping, and construction to the Authority for review and comment with the Committee prior to the start of construction.

C. Specific Regulations   

  1. Regulations Applicable to All Properties
    • Statement of Purpose - A basic purpose of this plan, in promoting the rehabilitation and conservation within Huntington is to provide standards for improvements which will serve the goals and objectives of the community. All improvements shall reflect quality of design, materials, and techniques, and appropriate lighting shall be integrally designed to serve the entire project area. None of the regulations contained herein shall be construed to release any developer, owner, or other individual from required conformance to all applicable County regulations, controls, and ordnances.

    • Easements - No building shall be erected on or over any utility easement, unless expressly agreed to by all necessary parties.

    • Parking and Circulation - Huntington Parking and Circulation Plan will be developed by the Authority and the designated representatives of the Huntington Citizens Association to address the following objectives:
      • adequate vehicular and pedestrian circulation through the project area,
      • separation of pedestrian and vehicular traffic where feasible,
      • provision of continuous sidewalks and bicycle paths along Huntington Avenue when that road is widened or improved,
      • provision of two pedestrian. activated traffic signals on Huntington Avenue when that road is widened or improved. Prior to installation of these two lights, the possibility of placing four-way stop signs on Huntington Avenue as an interim measure should be investigated.
      • maximum opportunity for resident parking where appropriate,
      • reasonable access to and egress from all land uses (particularly the Community Center) and parking lots in an efficient manner, and
      • minimum obstruction to efficient traffic flow in the streets ln the project area.
      Upon adoption of the Huntington Parking and Circulation Plan by the Citizens Association and the Authority, all parking and circulation improvements to both public and private areas within the Conservation District will comply with the standards set forth in that Plan.

    • Environmental Improvements - An Environmental Improvements Plan will be developed for Huntington to address the following objectives:
      • adequate buffering between residential and commercial or institutional properties,
      • adequate buffering between Huntington Avenue and all properties which abut it,
      • adequate buffering between I-495 and the homes in Lower Huntington,
      • maximum open space and recreation areas within the community,
      • appropriate aesthetic guidelines for exterior renovation of duplex units and apartments,
      • appropriate types and location of vegetation and retaining walls to prevent further slippage of the marine clays which are present in much of the community,
      • placing overhead utility lines underground wherever legally feasible, and
      • a cohesive visual character for the community.
      Upon adoption of the Huntington Environmental Improvements Plan by the Citizens Association and the Authority, all modifications and improvements to the terrain and landscape will comply with the provisions of that Plan.

    • Garbage and Rubbish - The following regulations shall apply to the removal of garbage, rubbish and litter by property owners:

      It shall be unlawful for the owner of any property, after having been notified by the Fairfax County Health Director, to fall to remove any and all garbage, rubbish, litter, or other substances which have caused the premise to become unclean, unsightly, insanitary, obnoxious or a blight to the community. When the County Health Director has determined that a violation exists, he shall notify the owner of the land or lot in accordance with Fairfax County code. If such garbage, rubbish, litter or other substances are not removed, the Fairfax County Director of Public Works shall cause removal and assess the cost and expenses against the owner of such property, as provided in the County code.

  2. Regulations Applicable to Residential Areas

    • Land Use - The intensity of land use within the program area boundaries shall conform to that specified in the Official Zoning Map of Fairfax County in force at the time of adoption of this Conservation Plan. The designated densities shall apply to all renovation and future development within the program area. All uses shall be limited to and shall conform with regulations which are enumerated in the existing or proposed zoning ordinance of the Code of Fairfax County, Virginia, as amended.

    • Home Improvement Loan and Grant Recipients - Those property owners receiving loans or grants from the Authority for the rehabilitation of their properties will be required to upgrade such properties to conform with HUD Property Rehabilitation Standards unless waived by the Authority, and to conform with housing hygiene and building codes applicable in Fairfax County, unless waived by the appropriate County body pursuant to applicable laws and regulations. The Authority will assign a rehabilitation specialist to inspect and oversee all properties undergoing rehabilitation and insure compliance with rehabilitation standards. This person, or a duly authorized designee, will make periodic site visits and will be responsible for making reports to the Authority.

  3. Regulations Applicable to Neighborhood Commercial and Institutional Facilities

    The intensity of land use for nonresidential areas within the program boundaries is also that specified in the Official Zoning Map of Fairfax County in force at the time this Plan is adopted. Only those uses permitted in the commercial districts of the existing or proposed zoning ordinance of Fairfax County will be permitted in the program area.

    The following objectives shall be met by any new commercial development:
    • The structures, signing, and lighting will be innovatively designed to be compatible in scale and character with the neighborhood, and
    • The commercial and institutional uses will be arranged in such a manner that they will not adversely affect other uses. Small scale professional offices may be integrated within residential buildings as permitted under County law, and
    • Surface parking lots of five spaces or more will be screened from a public road or street by walls or solid landscaping material at least five feet in height, and
    • Adequate and safe pedestrian access will be available from within the community.

  4. Regulations Applicable to Public and Quasi-Public Areas and Facilities

    • Park and Playground Development - Public open spaces shall be provided under the Conservation Plan for both active and passive use by all age groups. Only incidental structures to serve parks and recreational uses shall be permitted in areas designated for parks and playgrounds. Improvements may include, but are not necessarily limited to, rain shelters, permanent playground equipment, park furniture, and landscaping. Acquisition of necessary property for public open space shall be undertaken pursuant to Sections V and YIII of this Plan. All such property shall be turned over to the Park Authority for design, implementation, and maintenance.
    • Underground Utilities - At the time of alteration or street renovation, all overhead utility lines within 200 feet of the center line of Huntington Avenue will be placed underground, whenever legally feasible.
    • Sidewalks - Whenever legally feasible, a continuous sidewalk will be constructed on one or both sides of Huntington Avenue when that road is widened or improved.

D. Duration of Controls, Regulations, and Standards  

The controls set out above are compatible with existing County codes. Rehabilitation and new construction within the project area will, for a period of twenty-five years from the date of approval of this Plan by the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors, be subject to these controls, regulations and standards, and to any more restrictive provisions which may be contained in this Plan. Any controls imposed in disposition documents relating to those properties acquired by the Authority will run for their stated time periods.

Procedure for Plan Amendment
All proposed amendments to the Conservation Plan shall be submitted to the Authority for the purpose of holding a public hearing to provide the opportunity for residents of the project area and all other affected parties to voice their views on the proposal. The Authority shall then submit the amendment along with its recommendations to the Board of Supervisors for consideration. Prior to taking final action on any amendment, the Board shall hold a public hearing. Any Conservation Plan amendments that require an amendment of the Comprehensive Plan shall further require the approval of the amendment and the Comprehensive Plan change by the Planning Commission.

Time Limitations
There is no stated limitation on the length of time within which the program activities must be completed.

Program Funding
The Neighborhood Improvement Program and its annual appropriations shall be approved by the Fairfax County Redevelopment and Housing Authority and the Board of Supervisors for lmplementation of the Conservation Plan and Improvement Program prior to each program year. Funds from all sources allowable under Virginia law may be appropriated to be spent on approved program activities. Due to the fact that many project costs are estimated and since flexibility ln such an undertaking is necessary, the County Executive shall have the authority to shift funding from one approved project to another as necessary during the program year.